Sweet Potato Toasts, Three Ways

Lentine Alexis
by Lentine Alexis
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Sweet Potato Toasts, Three Ways

The sweet potato toast trend is alive and well. You’ve likely seen the dolled up toasts parading around Instagram by health-conscious people looking to ditch bread and sub in super-powered sweet potato. But there are chef-driven, flavor-forward versions that go beyond the basic Tex-Mex, BLT and banana and peanut butter ways to amp up your toast game. But, first, how do you make a sweet potato “toast” anyway?

It’s easier than you think:

5-STEP SWEET POTATO TOAST

Step 1: Pick a tater.

Choose a big, fat sweet potato or yam. Look for potatoes that are relatively tube-shaped, so they’re easier to slice. Then scrub with water, pat dry and trim off the pointy ends with a knife. Leaving the skin on means the potatoes hold up better in storage (plus, skin is so nutritious! Keep it!)

Step 2: Slice your “toasts.”

Slice your sweet potato lengthwise. If you’re using a knife, be safe and cut the potato in half across middle first, then lengthwise into pieces that are about 1/4-inch thick — like little slabs of bread.

Step 3: Bake those toasts.

Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C), then arrange the slices on a wire rack set on a large baking sheet, Bake for 15–25 minutes or until potatoes are tender but not cooked all the way through. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the slices to cool completely before storing them in an airtight container in the fridge until you’re ready to eat them. Pro tip: Don’t store them before they’re cool or they’ll get sweaty, and it will be very difficult to “toast!” them later!

Step 4: Make your toast.

When it’s go-time, simply add the desired number of slices to the toaster or toaster oven and toast away as you would bread. It may take some practice to find the sweet spot with your toaster to create the perfect bubbly, crispy and soft slices, but start with one toasting cycle to see what happens. When it comes to topping them, let your imagination run wild, or let whatever’s in your fridge dictate the toast.

These three ideas are favorites:

Massage 1/2 cup (45g) thinly sliced purple cabbage and 1/2 cup (45g) shredded carrot with 2 tablespoons rice vinegar and a pinch of salt. Drizzle with olive oil. In a small bowl, whisk together 1 teaspoon white miso paste with 1 teaspoon maple syrup, 1 teaspoon Bragg’s Liquid Aminos and enough water to thin (about 1/2 tablespoon). Set aside while you toast your sweet potato. Smear the sweet potato toast with the miso paste, top with the cabbage and carrot slaw. Add a small handful of sunflower sprouts and 1 teaspoon sesame seeds.

Cook one strip of bacon to crispy, chop it into small pieces and set aside. Prepare one egg to your liking. (Try a fried egg prepared in 1 tablespoon of olive oil.) Set aside the bacon and egg. Sauté 1 cup (225g) roughly chopped spinach with 1 clove of finely chopped garlic in 1 tablespoon of oil, just until the greens wilt. Top the sweet potato toast with the sauteed greens, 1/4 of a sliced avocado, bacon and egg. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

In a 350°F (177°C) oven, toast 1/4 cup (30g) coarsely chopped pecans until just fragrant. Set aside. Next, warm a sauté pan over medium-high heat, adding 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sauté 1 cup (100g) collard greens with 1/4 cup (40g) finely chopped red onion until the greens are slightly wilted and the onions are just translucent. Add a pinch of salt and crushed red or aleppo pepper then remove from heat. Top the toast with the collards, drizzle with 2 teaspoons maple syrup and add the chopped toasted pecans.

About the Author

Lentine Alexis
Lentine Alexis
Lentine is a curious, classically trained chef and former pro athlete. She uses her bicycle, raw life and travel experiences and organic ingredients to inspire athletes and everyone to explore, connect and expand their human experiences through food. She previously worked as a Chef/Recipe Developer/Content Creator and Culinary Director at Skratch Labs – a sports nutrition company dedicated to making real food alternatives to modern “energy foods.” Today, she writes, cooks, speaks and shares ideas for nourishing sport and life with whole, simple, delicious foods.

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