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High-Protein Oatmeal

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High-Protein Oatmeal

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This oatmeal from Love and Zest is packed with more protein than your average bowl of oats—all thanks to egg whites!  For an even bigger protein boost, top with chia seeds or sliced almonds.

To log this recipe, search the food database for: MyFitnessPal High Protein Oatmeal

 

Kristina LaRue - Love and Zest headshot

Kristina LaRue, RD, CSSD, LDN is a sports dietitian in Orlando, FL and co-author of the Flat Belly Cookbook for Dummies. She writes the food and nutrition blog, Love & Zest, where she shares recipes, life, and nutrition. Connect with her outside of the blog on Pinterest,  Twitter and Instagram.

Photo courtesy of Kristina LaRue.

Original recipe can be found on Love & Zest.

About the Author

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99 responses to “High-Protein Oatmeal”

  1. Avatar Lisa Martin says:

    Sounds great, but why is everything measured in cups and tablespoons? For one thing, this means absolutely nothing to your UK users who don’t use cups, but also a “cup” is a very inaccurate way of measuring something – how many blueberries fit into a cup? How much do those blueberries weigh? Depends on how big your blueberries are, surely? How packed your cup is, how big your cup is?! Measuring so inaccurately like this, how can you be so sure of the calorie count for this recipe? As people who are concerned with counting calories and making every calorie count, it would be very helpful for the MFP user community to have measurements in grams (for solids) or ml (for liquids). If you’re going to use cups, could you at least indicate in the recipe how much in g or ml a “cup” is?

    • Avatar Diane says:

      Because the author is from the US and we use cups and tablespoons.

      • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

        Yes I know that! My point is that a “cup” or a “tablespoon” isn’t an absolute measurement of weight or volume, so while it’s fine to use cups or spoons if you just want your recipe proportions to be correct, it’s not a very accurate way of measuring things if you want to know how many calories are in them (which most of us on MFP do!). For example, you can fit more blueberries into a cup if they are small, so a cup of small blueberries will have a different amount of calories compared to a cup of large blueberries. If you measured the blueberries in grams however, it doesn’t matter whether they are big or small – a gram is a gram. Same with the banana – how big a banana are we talking here? A big banana could have way more calories than a small one – so how can this recipe state confidently that it has 240 cals per serving?

        • Avatar Kate says:

          all recipes can be altered to taste, use the recipe as a guide and measure all ingredients precisely, then add it all to the MFP recipe builder and you’ll have a more accurate account of what you’re consuming.

        • Avatar Ange says:

          Oh My God! Really?! 1 cup of small berries will weigh the same as one cup of large berries. Just work it out for yourself. I live in NZ and I often have to convert recipes. I’ve never become angry or upset by this. Maybe up your calories. Your angry.

        • Avatar Ange says:

          Oh My God! Really?! 1 cup of small berries will weigh the same as one cup of large berries. Just work it out for yourself. I live in NZ and I often have to convert recipes. I’ve never become angry or upset by this. Maybe up your calories. Your angry.

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            I’m neither angry nor upset and I apologise if I came across that way – seriously there are more important things in the world to be angry and upset about!! I just thought I was making constructive criticism on this article. When people post those “Why aren’t I losing weight?!” threads on the MFP forums, the first thing people usually respond with is “are you sure you’re logging everything accurately?” and one of the biggest pieces of advice given is “invest in a weighing scale”. It’s really easy to overestimate the calories you are eating if you don’t weigh things accurately. Of course I can work it out for myself (and I do), but seeing as this recipe is already entered into the MFP database with a calorie count of 240 per serving, people could be tempted to log it “as is”, yet depending on the measurements you actually use, the calorie count for your version could be very different. it just doesn’t make sense to me why recipes on a calorie counting website wouldn’t use accurate measurements. That’s all.

          • Avatar Josie H says:

            I totally agree with your comments/suggestions. Everything you say makes absolute intelligent sense. What does not make sense is why anyone would disagree at all. Thanks.

          • Avatar Guest says:

            People all around the world need to convert. This lady is not exempt!

          • Avatar Josie H says:

            I totally agree with your comments/suggestions. Everything you say makes absolute intelligent sense. What does not make sense is why anyone would disagree at all. Thanks.

          • Avatar Aarchman07030 says:

            Lisa– I completely agree with your observation. Anyone who is serious about tracking their nutrition knows that weights are the only way to keep accurate track of food intake/nutrition.

            To present a recipe in the MFP context–directed to people at the more serious end of the nutrition-tracking spectrum–using “cups” of ingredients, followed by a nutrition summary that alleges to be precise misses the mark, in my opinion.

            That said, I do think the oatmeal recipe looks interesting and I will be trying it soon…

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            Thank you for backing me up! I thought my point made perfect sense and was valid constructive criticism but it seems that some people think I’m being argumentative or even too lazy to convert the measurements…?!! I have absolutely no problem with this recipe – it sounds yummy – and no problem with converting the measurements to my preferred units either. It’s just the accuracy thing. I like to know how many calories I’m eating, is all!

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            I’m neither angry nor upset and I apologise if I came across that way – seriously there are more important things in the world to be angry and upset about!! I just thought I was making constructive criticism on this article. When people post those “Why aren’t I losing weight?!” threads on the MFP forums, the first thing people usually respond with is “are you sure you’re logging everything accurately?” and one of the biggest pieces of advice given is “invest in a weighing scale”. It’s really easy to overestimate the calories you are eating if you don’t weigh things accurately. Of course I can work it out for myself (and I do), but seeing as this recipe is already entered into the MFP database with a calorie count of 240 per serving, people could be tempted to log it “as is”, yet depending on the measurements you actually use, the calorie count for your version could be very different. it just doesn’t make sense to me why recipes on a calorie counting website wouldn’t use accurate measurements. That’s all.

          • Avatar Aarchman07030 says:

            One doesn’t have to be “angry” to prefer precision. A cup of small berries will, in actual fact, be very similar in weight to a cup of large berries, but not necessarily “the same”. there will be more berries and less air space in a cup of small berries.

            The real point, though, is that volumes of solid ingredients are not a usefully precise way to measure foods when you are attempting to track your nutrition accurately. Weights of solid foods are a far more consistent and reliable method.

            When presenting recipes in an exercise and nutrition forum like MFP, there is a strong likelihood that the audience will contain a number of people who are trying to be as accurate as possible about their nutrition–why not use the more precise system of measurement?

        • Avatar Zoe says:

          I am from uk and I have measuring cups. They are a unit of measurement so a cup of flour for example will always be the same if you use the unit cup. X

        • Avatar Zoe says:

          I am from uk and I have measuring cups. They are a unit of measurement so a cup of flour for example will always be the same if you use the unit cup. X

        • Avatar Zoe says:

          I am from uk and I have measuring cups. They are a unit of measurement so a cup of flour for example will always be the same if you use the unit cup. X

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            Zoe this is not correct, unfortunately. A cup can only really be an absolute measurement for liquids, and even then I would argue that it is best to measure liquids in ml or fluid oz because a “cup” can vary depending on which country you are in. Dip your measuring cup into a bag of flour, and take out a cupful. Then, press it down with your fingers or a spoon. See how much more you can get into your cup when the flour is compacted? Weigh that amount of flour on some weighing scales. Next, shake your bag of flour (with the bag closed obviously!). This will get air into your flour, so now when you take out a “cupful”, you’ll notice it weighs much less than the compacted cup (and therefore has far fewer calories)! Obviously this is an extreme example – you don’t normally compact your flour down, or shake it up, but the volume of flour you can fit in a cup does vary. Far better to measure in g or oz.

          • Avatar Interesting topic says:

            Point made. Lisa have you seen a big difference in the calories by measuring this way? Like significant enough to share a recipe differently ( like the one above) to show the difference?

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            I always convert recipes and measure in grams/ml so i wouldn’t really know. But it would make sense that there could be potentially large differences in calorie counts, especially if you are trying to measure high calorie foods like butter or oil in cups/spoons.

        • Avatar Zoe says:

          I am from uk and I have measuring cups. They are a unit of measurement so a cup of flour for example will always be the same if you use the unit cup. X

        • Avatar Zoe says:

          I am from uk and I have measuring cups. They are a unit of measurement so a cup of flour for example will always be the same if you use the unit cup. X

        • Avatar Cup says:

          A cup is a very common unit of measurement. It is 250ml

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            Fine, but you can only measure liquids in ml. You can’t measure solids in ml because the volume changes depending on particle size and air spaces in between, as per my example above with the blueberries, and below with the flour.

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            Just looked this up and apparently a cup is actually 240ml.

        • Avatar Shemar Moore's Bae says:

          Ummmm, as a Canadian, I still have the standard cup measuring utensils. That being said, I don’t believe the amount of calories is significant. Think about it….if a cup of blueberries is 50 calories compared to 240 g at 48 calories, (and I’m just using this as an example.. so don’t shoot the messenger), you’re looking at a small amount of calories. your food intake for the day won’t be overly significant if you’re off by 50 calories or so.

          • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

            Maybe not if you’re measuring something low-cal, like blueberries, but the calories could be very significantly different if you were measuring something calorie-dense in a cup – like butter or oil.

    • Avatar Nataliya Kondranina says:

      Hello! I usually use in such recipes standart glasses (about 250 ml) and it works well. 1cup is about 235 ml

    • Avatar CJ says:

      Then go weigh/measure in grams yourself. Problem solved.

  2. Avatar Susan Galbraith says:

    I eat oatmeal for breakfast a lot, but never thought of adding egg whites. I will definitely give this a try, thanks for sharing!

  3. Avatar Patricia Powers-Williamson says:

    I don’t like bananas but will do it without them. Looks great!

  4. Avatar Erica Thieman says:

    I made this for breakfast this morning! Life changing! So delicious!!! I omitted the banana because I didn’t have any, and it was still amazing. I was skeptical about the egg whites not scrambling, but they didn’t! Thanks for the recipe idea!

  5. Avatar Erica Thieman says:

    I made this for breakfast this morning! Life changing! So delicious!!! I omitted the banana because I didn’t have any, and it was still amazing. I was skeptical about the egg whites not scrambling, but they didn’t! Thanks for the recipe idea!

  6. Avatar **HungerGamesGal** says:

    I would enjoy this oatmeal recipe, if it didn’t have SOOO much sugar!

  7. Avatar Trevorfm says:

    What am I to do with all the egg yolks left over?

  8. Avatar hyounker says:

    Lisa, you are right. There are much better things to worry about than how many blueberries fit into a cup. The author is from the US and that’s how we do things. If you are trying to count calories to a finite number, you are wasting your time anyway! Who’s oats? Which brand milk? What kind of water? Fresh cinnamon or bottled cinnamon? White eggs or brown? And, of course, what size blueberries?

  9. Avatar Bette Hawes says:

    Ridiculous conversation ! What I’m hearing is that Lisa is unaware that the hotly contested cup and tablespoon are not the randomly sized items used at a place setting. Containers for measuring food in North America are generally sold in sets of 1 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup and 1/4 cup. Measuring spoons are in sets of 1 tablespoon, 1 teaspoon 1/2 and 1/4 teaspoon. These measuring container sizes are standardized. In Canada, we can choose containers with metric or imperial measurement, or both. Canada uses metric measure but much of our printed material and cookware comes from the USA, so we do the math and get on with it. Recipes are not meant to be scientific experiments. Relax and enjoy!

  10. Avatar Bette Hawes says:

    Ridiculous conversation ! What I’m hearing is that Lisa is unaware that the hotly contested cup and tablespoon are not the randomly sized items used at a place setting. Containers for measuring food in North America are generally sold in sets of 1 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup and 1/4 cup. Measuring spoons are in sets of 1 tablespoon, 1 teaspoon 1/2 and 1/4 teaspoon. These measuring container sizes are standardized. In Canada, we can choose containers with metric or imperial measurement, or both. Canada uses metric measure but much of our printed material and cookware comes from the USA, so we do the math and get on with it. Recipes are not meant to be scientific experiments. Relax and enjoy!

    • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

      Jeez, I just made a simple comment that, for more accurate calorie counting, it might be more helpful to provide measurements in grams and ml rather than cups and spoons. That’s all.

      • Avatar Rachel B says:

        Hi Lisa, as somebody who used to work in a science lab I feel your pain. 🙂 For those who are citing that we have standard sizes for teaspoons and cups, yes, that’s correct–they have the same volume (take up the same amount of space); Lisa’s point isn’t that these measurements aren’t standardized, but that depending on density, a TBS or cup of something could have different masses. A cup of finely milled flour weighs more than a cup of roughly milled flour; a TBS of coffee ground for a French press weighs less than a TBS of coffee ground for a drip machine; a cup of large berries weigh less than a cup of small berries, etc. It all has to do with the particle size of the food and the resulting air pockets. If somebody is really, truly, serious about counting calories, then giving the weight of something is a much better way to do it. I personally don’t weigh things but my friends who are professional chefs do–not for caloric reasons, but for accuracy and precision in baking. Let’s not all attack Lisa, here…she isn’t being combative or saying that everybody needs to buy a kitchen scale. Just that, for those who *are* really serious about tracking calories, it would be nice to give things in weights as well as volume measures like cups/TBS/ml. That seems like a reasonable request, given the nature of this website. If cups work for you (they do for me) then by all means, use them. 🙂

      • Avatar Rachel B says:

        Hi Lisa, as somebody who used to work in a science lab I feel your pain. 🙂 For those who are citing that we have standard sizes for teaspoons and cups, yes, that’s correct–they have the same volume (take up the same amount of space); Lisa’s point isn’t that these measurements aren’t standardized, but that depending on density, a TBS or cup of something could have different masses. A cup of finely milled flour weighs more than a cup of roughly milled flour; a TBS of coffee ground for a French press weighs less than a TBS of coffee ground for a drip machine; a cup of large berries weigh less than a cup of small berries, etc. It all has to do with the particle size of the food and the resulting air pockets. If somebody is really, truly, serious about counting calories, then giving the weight of something is a much better way to do it. I personally don’t weigh things but my friends who are professional chefs do–not for caloric reasons, but for accuracy and precision in baking. Let’s not all attack Lisa, here…she isn’t being combative or saying that everybody needs to buy a kitchen scale. Just that, for those who *are* really serious about tracking calories, it would be nice to give things in weights as well as volume measures like cups/TBS/ml. That seems like a reasonable request, given the nature of this website. If cups work for you (they do for me) then by all means, use them. 🙂

      • Avatar Nancy Secilia says:

        yes but I need the cups and spoon,,maybe it could be done in both

  11. Avatar Bette Hawes says:

    Ridiculous conversation ! What I’m hearing is that Lisa is unaware that the hotly contested cup and tablespoon are not the randomly sized items used at a place setting. Containers for measuring food in North America are generally sold in sets of 1 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup and 1/4 cup. Measuring spoons are in sets of 1 tablespoon, 1 teaspoon 1/2 and 1/4 teaspoon. These measuring container sizes are standardized. In Canada, we can choose containers with metric or imperial measurement, or both. Canada uses metric measure but much of our printed material and cookware comes from the USA, so we do the math and get on with it. Recipes are not meant to be scientific experiments. Relax and enjoy!

  12. Avatar Paliku says:

    Guess I will make little attempt at using this MyFitness option. The responses are quite pathetic and unfortunately, again, shows where our world is headed. Good luck to all in your fitness endeavors.

  13. Avatar jltheis7 says:

    Made with no sugar, 1 teaspoon dried cranberries, and unsweetened vanilla almond milk. The cranberries provide all the sweetness I like. I may also try a few walnuts or cinnamon.

  14. Avatar Sharon Carr says:

    1 Tbsp equals 15 grams,cc or ml
    1 tsp equals 5 grams,cc,or ml

  15. Avatar Sharon Carr says:

    1 Tbsp equals 15 grams,cc or ml
    1 tsp equals 5 grams,cc,or ml

  16. Avatar Sharon Carr says:

    1 Tbsp equals 15 grams,cc or ml
    1 tsp equals 5 grams,cc,or ml

    • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

      At the risk of causing yet more upset (and believe me I don’t mean to…I’m a scientist, I like accuracy…yes I’m pedantic!! 🙂 this is not always strictly true. In fact it is only true of water. 1ml of water weighs 1g, so a level tbsp of water would indeed weigh 15g, but other liquids may be more or less dense so may weigh slightly different amounts. You also can’t accurately compare solids to liquids. If you measured, say, 1 tbsp of flour using a spoon, you would find this weighs a different amount to say, 1 tbsp of rice.

  17. Avatar Sharon Carr says:

    1 Tbsp equals 15 grams,cc or ml
    1 tsp equals 5 grams,cc,or ml

  18. Avatar H. Sanders says:

    I’m looking foreword to trying this. Not so sure about the egg whites. Does it change the taste?

    Lisa, I do understand your concern about measuring accuracy. For my own recipes I weigh anything that isn’t liquid. In the USA, measuring cups are standardized so there isn’t any worry about how “big” the cup is, they come in standardized measures of 1/4, 1/2, 1/3, 2/3, 3/4 and 1 cup.

    I often have the same issues when I try recipes from the UK, Europe or Africa. I simply use an internet conversion chart. It’s easy, you might try that if you have concerns about accurate measurements for US recipes. Good Luck!

  19. Avatar H. Sanders says:

    I’m looking foreword to trying this. Not so sure about the egg whites. Does it change the taste?

    Lisa, I do understand your concern about measuring accuracy. For my own recipes I weigh anything that isn’t liquid. In the USA, measuring cups are standardized so there isn’t any worry about how “big” the cup is, they come in standardized measures of 1/4, 1/2, 1/3, 2/3, 3/4 and 1 cup.

    I often have the same issues when I try recipes from the UK, Europe or Africa. I simply use an internet conversion chart. It’s easy, you might try that if you have concerns about accurate measurements for US recipes. Good Luck!

  20. Avatar xxx says:

    I am very disappointed, this recipe for high protein oatmeal is suggesting egg whites, and it seems this the packaged egg whites, which are very bad for your health. Please can you stick to foods as close to nature as possible!

    • Avatar Cbsplace says:

      I wouldn’t use packaged egg whites either, but with a large egg, typically you would get 2 tbsp egg white each…so just use 3 eggs and you should be good!!!

    • Avatar Cbsplace says:

      I wouldn’t use packaged egg whites either, but with a large egg, typically you would get 2 tbsp egg white each…so just use 3 eggs and you should be good!!!

  21. Avatar starr says:

    For those squabbling over measurements – 1 cup is 250 ml.

    • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

      Thanks for clarifying. Ml is a measurement used only for liquids, though, so while it would be fine to measure the milk and water in cups and be reasonably accurate, there would still be an issue with measuring the solid items as these cannot be measured in ml.

      • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

        According to this US government website a cup is actually 240ml. Not to quibble over 10ml…but it could potentially make a difference, especially if you are measuring something calorie dense, like oil or butter.

      • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

        According to this US government website a cup is actually 240ml. Not to quibble over 10ml…but it could potentially make a difference, especially if you are measuring something calorie dense, like oil or butter.

  22. Avatar Peggy says:

    Thanks for the good laugh and recipe however inaccurate its measurements may be! 🙂

  23. Avatar Lisa Martin says:

    Oh for goodness sake, I give up.

  24. Avatar sharon says:

    Hi , I am a Coeliac & was under the assumption that oats are not gluten free, I love them but haven’t been eating them for this reason.Am I behind the times & has their status changed ???

  25. Avatar F begum says:

    This may be really obvious but just to clarify, 100% egg whites means the powdered stuff rather than real egg whites (ie yolks removed?). Would it mess up,the recipe if I put real egg whites in?

  26. Avatar Jessica Girson says:

    I’d really like to know why this is listed as “GF”. As someone who’s entire week would be wrecked if I ingested even something cross contaminated with gluten, this worries me. I know those of us who are in this predicament pretty much do our research. But the first months-year are really tough and I remember putting a lot of faith in what people said. Old fashioned rolled oats are not gf. Oatmeal is tricky in the beginning and there’s a lot of misinformation. Please change you allergin info. Thanks.

    • Avatar Lisa Martin says:

      I looked this up and apparently oats ARE gluten free, but they contain a protein called avenin, which is very similar to gluten. People with coeliac disease/gluten sensitivities may or may not also be sensitive to avenin. I guess the tag “gluten free” is accurate in this case because oats don’t have gluten in them, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that people with gluten sensitivities won’t feel negative effects. There is also the problem (as with many foods) that oats are often processed in the same factories as wheat products, so there may be some cross contamination. I guess it depends on how sensitive you are to gluten as to whether you should avoid oats or not.

  27. Avatar Josie says:

    Diane still doesn’t get it

  28. Avatar Mg8Studios says:

    Thanks for the recipe Kristina. As a person with severe Ulcerative Colitis, I’m on a high protein, very strict diet, so this recipe should work for me. But I’m not able to use the milk so I can substitute with more water or almond milk.

  29. Avatar Aim says:

    How much is a pinch in metric? Jk. seriously

  30. Avatar Aim says:

    How much is a pinch in metric? Jk. seriously

  31. Avatar Aim says:

    How much is a pinch in metric? Jk. seriously

  32. Avatar Aim says:

    How much is a pinch in metric? Jk. seriously

  33. Avatar Markus Schulz says:

    Yes house wife’s in the USA use volume based however professionals in the USA use weight based too. I did grow up in a weight based country but moved to a volume base. I know both systems very well and in my opinion weight based is more efficient. First no cups and spoons need to be dirtied, less work for me. And second more precision is possible. A digital scale with tare function should be something everybody at least here at myfitnesspal.com should own.

  34. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

  35. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

  36. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

  37. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

  38. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

  39. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

    • Avatar tomfen says:

      That’s exactly what I was thinking. A two egg omelet with a slice of whole wheat toast packs more protein and is certainly more delicious and nutritious.

  40. Avatar Alfred says:

    11g per serving isn’t high protein. Might as well eat plain oatmeal then have 6 egg whites along side it.

  41. Avatar azcorrie says:

    I made this oatmeal this morning. The BEST oatmeal I’ve ever had. Will be a morning staple. Thank you

  42. Avatar azcorrie says:

    I made this oatmeal this morning. The BEST oatmeal I’ve ever had. Will be a morning staple. Thank you

  43. Avatar Chrissy says:

    Could you please make it so I can “Pin” the daily recipes to Pinterest? That would be super helpful 🙂

  44. Avatar Chrissy says:

    Could you please make it so I can “Pin” the daily recipes to Pinterest? That would be super helpful 🙂

  45. Avatar Chrissy says:

    Could you please make it so I can “Pin” the daily recipes to Pinterest? That would be super helpful 🙂

  46. Avatar Jill says:

    Good Lord….is this thread for real?

  47. Avatar Jill says:

    Good Lord….is this thread for real?

  48. Avatar CJ says:

    High protein oatmeal? No.

  49. Avatar CJ says:

    High protein oatmeal? No.

  50. […] High Protein Oatmeal | Love and Zest: This oatmeal is packed with more protein than your average bowl of […]

  51. Avatar Robert Palmer says:

    Here we use more precise measurements…like a pinch and a handful. It all works out just fine.

  52. Avatar Vaishnavi Chheda says:

    Hi, this is great can you tell me what kind of Oats should we use?

  53. […] 2. High Protein Oatmeal | Love and Zest: This oatmeal is packed with 10g of protein all thanks to egg whites! For an even bigger protein boost, top with chia seeds or sliced almonds. […]

  54. Avatar Ron W says:

    I have a box of powdered egg whites that I don’t use a lot of (of which I don’t use a lot). Will they work in this recipe? Thanks

  55. Avatar Pops says:

    Soooo, how many angels can dance on the head of a pin?

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