Baked Honey Mustard Chicken

Share it:
5/5 (1)

Baked Honey Mustard Chicken

mfp ROD button finalThis juicy Baked Honey Mustard Chicken from The Honour System is easy to throw together and pops right into the oven. Just mix up your marinade, pour over the chicken and bake. Dinner’s ready in an hour with minimal effort.

To log this recipe, search the food database for: MyFitnessPal Baked Honey Mustard Chicken

 

the-honour-system-headshotThe Honour System is your one-stop resource for healthy, real food recipes. With mouth watering photography and step by step instructions, they show you how to eat well and how you can treat yourself without cheating yourself.

Photo courtesy of Sharon Rhodes. Original recipe can be found on The Honour System.

Related

  • sussexbythesea

    How can this be tagged no added sugar when you are using honey and your nutrient breakdown is 18g sugar per portion! ? No wonder the public is confused… am trying to reverse type 2 diabetes here…

    • Darren

      That is quite a bit of sugar. Im glad I saw your comment I wouldnt have noticed otherwise.

    • LovesIceCream68

      Sugar is sugar. And honey is (mostly) sugar. But if you’re choosing between the two from a health perspective, err on the side of the sticky stuff.

      Your body breaks food down into glucose in order to use it for fuel. The more complex a food — namely a carbohydrate — is, the more work it takes to break it down. Sugar is made of 50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose, the sugar typically found in fruits, and is broken down very easily, leading to a surge of blood glucose. What your body doesn’t use right away gets stored as fat. Honey is also made mostly of sugar, but it’s only about 30 percent glucose and less than 40 percent fructose. And there are also about 20 other sugars in the mix, many of which are much more complex, and dextrin, a type of starchy fiber. This means that your body expends more energy to break it all down to glucose. Therefore, you end up accumulating fewer calories from it.

      Honey also has trace elements in it — stuff that bees picked up while going from plant to plant. These will depend on region, so depending on the source of your honey it could have varying small amounts of minerals like zinc and selenium, as well as some vitamins. And because honey doesn’t break down in nature, it doesn’t contain preservatives or other additives.

      As with anything sweet, you can overdo it, but if you’re going to use a spoonful of something in your tea, go for honey over sugar.

      –Keith Kantor, Ph.D., a nutritionist and author of the children’s book The Green Box League of Nutritious Justice

      • Christine

        This had nothing to do with sussexbythesea’s point. The issue is the recipe stating “no added sugar” and clearly sugar has been added…

        • Bobsysue

          Christine my diabetic friend cannot have sugar but may have honey … And does.
          The recipe DOES NOT contain sugar – therefore those on sugar free eating for their health can eat this. Please be grateful for the recipes given to us or we’ll finish up with no assistance from MFP purely as people are so pedantic .

    • Jenny

      Honey is a natural type of sugar that bees make from flowers. It is a MUCH healthier choice compaired to sugar, and your body breaks it down easier than sugar, not sending it directly to the places where sugar is absorbed and stored, as quickly; therefore, you can use it more efficiently as energy, before it sets in as sugar would. Honey is actually good for you, even for us as diabetics. Just don’t over-do it. But the amount in this recipe, per serving, is only con#idered as one carb count (15 = 1) or a tad more, and you can have five carb counts per meal, so it really isn’t that bad. 🙂

    • Sarah

      There’s sugar free honey that can b used instead of regular honey. Taste just bout the same 🙂

  • LovesIceCream68

    Sugar is sugar. And honey is (mostly) sugar. But if you’re choosing between the two from a health perspective, err on the side of the sticky stuff.

    Your body breaks food down into glucose in order to use it for fuel. The more complex a food — namely a carbohydrate — is, the more work it takes to break it down. Sugar is made of 50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose, the sugar typically found in fruits, and is broken down very easily, leading to a surge of blood glucose. What your body doesn’t use right away gets stored as fat. Honey is also made mostly of sugar, but it’s only about 30 percent glucose and less than 40 percent fructose. And there are also about 20 other sugars in the mix, many of which are much more complex, and dextrin, a type of starchy fiber. This means that your body expends more energy to break it all down to glucose. Therefore, you end up accumulating fewer calories from it.

    Honey also has trace elements in it — stuff that bees picked up while going from plant to plant. These will depend on region, so depending on the source of your honey it could have varying small amounts of minerals like zinc and selenium, as well as some vitamins. And because honey doesn’t break down in nature, it doesn’t contain preservatives or other additives.

    As with anything sweet, you can overdo it, but if you’re going to use a spoonful of something in your tea, go for honey over sugar.

    • Disqusted

      Gotcha, Now quit pimping your book.

  • gonnaturnforty

    can’t find it in your data base…

  • nanaloseweight

    You mention, to begin, ”rinse & pat dry” the chicken, this is NOT recommended anymore as washing chicken is very dangerous.

    • Gen

      How is washing chicken dangerous?

      • Jame

        They word is if you wash your chicken the water splashes and you have Salmonella everywhere.

        • Not a Doctor but…

          Palm on face….

        • JustSayin’

          I wash everything I eat! Especially chicken!! Just make sure your faucet is not on full blast and spray your sink down with bleach after you’re done. Oh and I wear disposable gloves when handling raw meat.

        • K B

          Just put it in the dishwasher for a few minutes. No splashes. Or you could just not turn the water on full blast.

  • Guest

    A lot of these comments are aweful. If you do not like the reciepe then DO NOT make it and eat it, Simple as that. You and you alone are responsible for what you do to your body. If you cannot have the honey or sugar then find another chicken receipe.

    • camarks17

      Exactly! If you’re a diabetic or a pre-diabetic, absolutely you need to be more careful about what you eat. For someone like me who doesn’t have that much sugar to begin with, this looks like an awesome recipe! Less than 300 calories per serving, very little fat, and high protein for something that looks so delicious?? I will definitely try this one out.
      Everyone has a different meal plan. If you can’t have this one, like you said, find a different recipe.

    • K B

      I agree. What kind of moron would go to a recipe for “Honey Mustard Chicken” and then complain that there is honey in the recipe?!?!?!

  • Baggy315

    Sugar or not – A very nice recipe. Thank you

  • julie

    if you dont like the idea of using honey try rice malt syrup (lower in fructose). People are getting sugar mixed up with fructose. Lots of food we eat naturally contains sugar, try to find the ones that are lowest in fructose! When a recipe says sugar free it is usually talking about refined sugars. At the end of the day it is up to you to decide wether or not a recipe fits your dietary requirements or not. This is a great site with lots of healthy ideas and options for all!!

  • Gabriele Jones

    Come on ppl, I am so tiered of everyone picking everything and anything apart. Sugar is sugar and honey is honey. If you don’t like the recipe…don’t use it. Appreciate that someone took the time to post this recipe FOR FREE!

  • caroline

    I have a question. The serving size doesn’t really add up. It says use 24oz of chicken but the serving size is 4oz. and it serves 4 people. That doesn’t make sense.

    • MyFitnessPal

      Hi Caroline, The weights are different because water is lost during cooking. A 6-ounce chicken breast may lose 1-2 ounces in the process.

      • Natalie

        How many chicken breasts do you use in this recipe?

  • Starlet

    This is delicious!!! We cut the chicken into cubes, added onions & bell peppers to create kebabs then grilled on the BBQ. We halved the honey & served with leafy salad! We both don’t eat dairy so this recipe was perfect, healthy, dairy free & delicious!!! Thank you 🙂

    • Amanda

      Ooh, I like the kebab idea! Thank you for sharing, I may have to try that!

  • cpiton

    This looks good. Going to give it a try tonight. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

  • Julisa Marmolejos

    Just made this dish and it was quick, easy, and delicious! I face many challenges finding time to cook and cooking healthy meals that my spouse would enjoy with me. Huge win here! Thank you for sharing

  • stallcleaner1000

    Sorry to break the sugar debate, but I tried it today and I’d give it 5 stars! Let it sit to marinate for a little, then over cooked it a bit; oops! Still good with extra dressing. I cut it up, put it over a salad which I drizzled with the extra sauce, and served with broccoli and cheese. Yum!

  • Mel

    The recipe for Baked honey mustard chicken states to use 24oz chicken breasts. The instructions say serves 4 x 4oz chicken breast that is only 16 oz why tell us to use 24 oz why not just give ingredients for 4 breasts. Would the rest of the ingredients reduce also.
    Confused.

  • Sunnie84

    Thanks for the recipe. I love chicken breast and I have been looking for new ways to eat it without getting bored. Can’t wait to cook and eat it.

  • Paul Williams

    I tried this recipe tonight, with some slight modifications for ingredients not available to me, and it was a very nice tasting bit of chicken. This recipe goes into my “let’s do it again” file. I needed to replace sea salt, fresh chopped parsley and dried basil with kosher salt, dried parsley flakes and Club House brand Greek seasoning. That may have added to the calories and other markers slightly, but certainly not enough to blow my overall count for the day. Dinner for one, with three follow-up meals set aside for later. Perfect recipe. Thanks for posting it.

  • Lisa Wethington

    I made this recipe using boneless chicken thighs and reduced the honey to 2 tbs. I have a family of four and finding healthy meals to fit everyone’s taste is difficult. However, they all loved this recipe!
    Many thanks to all who share recipes!

  • HipsterHater

    “local if possible” for the honey.

    what do you do if you live somewhere that doesn’t produce honey eh you dirty feminist hippie

  • Katie Harper

    You shouldn’t be telling people to wash the chicken. It spreads bacteria and is a serious health risk. Basic food safety.

  • Amy

    Don’t rinse chicken, easiest way to spread salmonella around your kitchen

  • AmandaDob

    This was so good, my picky two year old just ate half a breast!! Wow! Thank you! For some reason mine cooked after only 20 minutes but my oven seems to be pretty high powered I’m finding these days. Thanks for the toddler approved recipe!

  • Kimberly Wicker

    Just popped this in the oven, can’t wait to try it!!!!! Did add some sweet peppers sliced up and used local honeycomb honey. This will be a great addition to our monthly recipe list. Thank you!!

  • Rachel Goulart

    I would like to say THANK YOU for posting a free recipe for people to use if they would like. Not that everyone who reads it HAS to use it, so the complaining is seriously rediculous and unnecessary! No added sugar…meaning no added SUGAR! I understand honey is a sweetener that contains sugar, but it is natural sugar. Do all of you fools write to Welcher’s and complain that there is actually sugar in their “no added sugar” juices?! No? Well that’s probably because A. your not able to hide behind your internet screen, trying to be a “know-it-all” bully, or B. because contrary to how childish and uneducated/uninformed you sound on here, there is actually something working in that brain of yours and you realize that fruits contain natural sugars. OMGosh just like honey!! So if you are a diabetic and can’t eat honey (though most can) you can either find a sugar free honey (my golly they do exsist) or don’t make the damn recipe. Starting some “omg there’s sugar in honey and she said no added sugar so now we’re all gonna die” uproar is just unnecessary. So thanks for the delightful sounding recipe! I think I will try it in my crockpot 🙂

  • GrannyLu

    Ok-I can be a bit dense at times & this is one of them. Do I transfer them to a baking dish/pan once they are coated or do I bake them in the glass dish they were prepared in

  • Made the Honey Mustard Chicken today and loved it.