Quiz: What Type of Yoga Is Best for You?

Aleisha Fetters
by Aleisha Fetters
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Quiz: What Type of Yoga Is Best for You?

Yoga is anything but a one-type-bends-all workout. Every practice and each class emphasizes different approaches to movement, speed, mental rewards and workout preferences. Take this quiz to determine which way you lean.

 

About the Author

Aleisha Fetters
Aleisha Fetters

Aleisha is a health and fitness writer, contributing to online and print publications including Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Runner’s World, TIME, USNews.com, MensFitness.com and Shape.com. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she concentrated on health and science reporting. She is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA. You can read more from Aleisha at kaleishafetters.com, or follow her on Twitter @kafetters.

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5 responses to “Quiz: What Type of Yoga Is Best for You?”

  1. Avatar sorrah720 says:

    Bikram is just one of many hot yoga options. If you want a good sweat but don’t care for the bikram style-high heat and long holding strength poses, there are other hot classes too: hot power yoga classes (strength/balance), hot flow classes (vinyasa-y), etc.

  2. It depends. You have to determine which is the right style for you. Hatha is gentle, great for beginners. Power yoga for weight loss. Iyengar if your prone to injuries.

  3. Avatar Filoe16 says:

    Thanks for the article, I am interested in trying yoga but don’t know anything about it. Can you recommend good instructor videos one can try out at home first before paying for something I might not like?

  4. Avatar Linda says:

    Fun infographic, but a bit oversimplified. I also think that it misses the possibility that people with the “pushing limits” workout personality might actually really benefit by balancing their cross fit or gym workouts with a slower yoga practice that emphasizes observing your physical limits (not always pushing) and focusing on quieting their minds. I’m thinking especially of people who are so Type A, always one step ahead, that they don’t feel comfortable sitting with their present state of mind and body that they just dismiss hatha or vinyasa outright. Maybe the first split should be whether you want to balance mind and body or just get another workout.

  5. Avatar christabel says:

    None of the above. Kundalini or GTFO. 😀

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