The New Eating Habit That’s Changing My Life

by Diana Keeler
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The New Eating Habit That’s Changing My Life

Not long ago someone asked me to name my favorite food, and without a second of hesitation I replied: “Wheat Thins.” I love Wheat Thins the way other people love chocolate cake. I have eaten a box of Wheat Thins while watching a movie, instead of popcorn. I have a favorite flavor (Original) and a preferred way to eat them: facedown, so that the salty side is applied directly to the tongue. When I lived in London, visiting friends and family would bring me as many boxes of Wheat Thins and Krispy Kreme donuts as they could fit into a carry-on. Baked goods, obviously, are my weakness.

Lately, I’ve been thinking about the wisdom not only of my Wheat Thins addiction, but my reliance on what I’m calling “boxed carbs”: Wheat Thins, of course, but also pasta and cookies. (Did someone say Walker’s shortbread? Yum!) I don’t wake up in the morning dying to get to the gym, but I like working out; I’ve run two marathons and dominate my family during our Fitbit competitions. I travel a lot, so I rotate between my favorite workout DVDs when I’m on the road—mostly P90X (the original) and Insanity. It’s a good thing I’m into fitness, because my nutritional habits are, at best, questionable, and at worst, negligent. I’m generally a believer in a low-key attitude toward diet—I put a lot of stock in the ideas behind the “non-diet diet,” which holds that your “your body instinctively knows what it needs.” Unfortunately, my body has, too often as of late, been suggesting what it needs is spaghetti and cookies. My head, however, does not believe this to be true, and I’m pretty sure my reliance on boxed carbs is a matter of having a basic palate and poor planning (“I’m hungry and have nothing else to eat”), rather than my cells crying out for penne and pesto sauce out of a jar.

This realization has been on my mind while reading new, ever-conflicting studies about low-carb versus high-carb diets (sample headlines: “Low-carb diet may make you unhealthy, shorten your life: study”; “Low-Carb Diet Most Effective for Weight Loss”). Of equal interest are famous investigations like the Tokelau Island Migrant Study, which followed Polynesian islanders as they transitioned from a diet rich in fat (typically from coconuts) and fish to one where processed foods took a more central role. Processed grains, you probably could have guessed, have not been kind to this population.

I decided to make one small change. I didn’t think it was necessary to strip all refined carbs, or wheat products, entirely out of my diet. I’m not gluten-intolerant or celiac, though I do have an aunt who struggled with weight loss for decades until she stopped eating wheat products. (Not sure what gluten is? You’re not alone! Check out this video from Jimmy Kimmel Live.)

I also decided to skirt the low-GI/high-GI issue, which acknowledges that not all carbs affect body chemistry in the same way, and makes it clear that a non-fat yogurt, for example, is less disruptive to blood sugar levels than a glazed doughnut. My ban would not affect carbs that didn’t come out of a box (or its equivalents). White bread out of a plastic bag, no. A sandwich from the local shop, with bread made that morning and stale by evening: fine.

All that makes my change a small one—which I think is the way to go, since every time I’ve naively tried to make a big change in my diet, it’s backfired terribly. (A recent Lent without chocolate ended in a massacre of candy bunnies at Easter.) So for a month, I’m going to lock up my Barilla, my shortbreads, my pancake mix and even my Wheat Thins—one whole month without boxed carbs. I’m not sure what I’m going to eat, but I’m positive it’s going to be better than what I had for dinner last night. Which may or may not have been pancakes.

Would you be able to give up boxed carbs? Share your tips for Diane in the comments below! (She’ll be letting us know how her “one small change” diet is going in the coming weeks.)

 

Photo: Toy Master/Flickr

 

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  • Peaceandwater

    This article definitely resonates with me, a fellow “boxed carbs” addict in recovery. I used to eat a whole box of Wheat Thins (or Triscuits) as a vehicle for an entire container of hummus. Now I put hummus on my salad and I don’t keep crackers in my house.

  • It’s tough, they have aisles and aisles of this crap at every store, yet it can be difficult to get the real stuff. Nice article. I would love to cut it. My workplace stocks all of this stuff in the office, even harder to rid the temptation!

  • Joan Matts

    If you still want the pesto, take a zucchini and make “noodles” by cutting them into strips (there are a few devices that make this super easy), sauteing them lightly and then adding your sauce. I had gastric bypass and find eating pasta difficult, so this has become my solution. Good luck and I hope this experiment gives you lots of insights into what will work for you long term.

  • SammyDEEEEEE

    Hahahahaha, Diana, this was wonderfully written. Consider yourself followed (on TWITTER, jeez).

  • Amy

    I have given up all but complex carbs…it has made a huge difference but I love my whole grain toast and other new carbs!

  • Genetic_Drift

    sample headlines: “Low-carb diet may make you unhealthy, shorten your life: study”; “Low-Carb Diet Most Effective for Weight Loss”

    I don’t think these headlines are conflicting. High protein/low carb can shorten your life, but low carb can make weight loss easier; so you could go high carb still but struggle more to lose weight. This makes sense since being overweight/obese puts you at higher disease risk, but being thin doesn’t necessarily make you healthy.

    Additionally, Italians seem to live long lives with high carb diets 😉

    I think GI is a great way to keep everything in check, especially as low GI foods should keep you feeling fuller for longer, and therefore you can tend to eat less.

  • Debbie Reiter

    I did this during Lent a couple of years ago, giving up bread, pasta, cookies, CAKE! I love cake! Just to see if I could break my weight loss plateau. I’ve heard about all the hype on going gluten free. I had no idea that I had an intolerance to wheat products until my body responded in a positive way to the absence of gluten products. I was suffering with inflammation in my wrist and fingers, trigger finger. After the 6 weeks I was feeling better. Wrist stopped hurting, fingers moving AND the best part . . . the canker sores in my mouth went away! I started losing weight again too! I would’ve never known if I didn’t give up gluten. It wasn’t easy, but feeling better is much more preferable 🙂

    • Shemar Moore’s bae

      I doubt it was gluten, I would say it was all the chemicals and preservatives of all those “boxed” goods that you were intolerant to.

      • Scott DeLeeuw

        Or even all the sugar… Sugar causes all sorts of inflammation.

      • Debbie Reiter

        Yes, I gave up boxed good, processed foods and cut my sugar intake WAY back! I don’t drink sodas or milk or fruit drinks. Cutting back on dairy has helped too!

  • Michelle

    Go raw till 4 vegan! It’s awesome. No need to cut down on carbs then ;D Trust me though, it works. I look and feel better than ever. 🙂

    • Shemar Moore’s bae

      that’s just another gimmick…..

    • Crys

      Getting iron from meat is important and necessary. Crys, B.S. Exercise phys and BSN-R.M.

      • Nony

        Iron from meat is not important or necessary. There are other sources of iron. “Bro, do you even Science?”

        • Chellsie

          Your body more readily digests and is able to use the iron in animal proteins rather than from plant sources. It is not that you cannot get enough iron from say leafy greens, you just have to eat quite a bit more for you body to digest the same amount of iron.

  • lnader

    My strategy is too never have these items at home. When I do crave them, I have to go the store and buy them. That usually deters me for long enough for the craving to pass. When I do buy them, I buy them in small portions that can be consumed in 1-2 servings. Like I buy fresh pasta instead of a whole box of dried or I buy one cookie from the coffee shop instead of the grocery store.

  • Beeker

    My husband and I have decreased the amount of boxed carbs over the last two years. I loved wheat thins, triscuits, cookies, cakes, and bread. I ate entirely too much of it. Counting calories led to the decrease in boxed carbs because they were high in calories and did not curb our hunger. Lean proteins, vegetables, and small amounts of complex carbohydrates (wild rice, sweet potatoes, quinoa) are filling and help drop the pounds.

    • Lori

      I agree and quite a few of those processed boxed carbs still have trans fats.

    • LAW

      Good for you both! I’m wondering if I should / shouldn’t eat brown rice…do you? How about rye bread or whole wheat bread in moderation? Do you make sandwiches? What kind of bread, if any, do you still eat?

      • beeker

        I eat brown rice and rye bread in moderation. I found 60 calorie wraps that I stuff with veggies and lean proteins instead of bread. I still have 20 pounds to lose, so I am watching my calories.

    • Crys

      Good for you! Smart choices!

  • Julia

    I heard small changes are the way to go! I think you’re smart not to cut all carbs. It’s normal to eat some carbs in moderation!

  • Robyn Nadolny

    This story certainly rings true for me. As of late my nemesis is cheetos Flaming Popcorn.

  • jenn

    I had wondered if I was the only one that loved those darned walker shortbread cookies! You never see any one buy them but most times only one box left! Good luck on your journey! Wheat thins are trouble makers lol!

  • Lori

    I gave up wheat. It made me feel so much better that I gave up corn. I felt even better so I eventually gave up soy, beans and sugar. I’ve lost 30 pounds since March without limiting any other foods. Loving this diet and my labs have drastically improved.

  • MBS

    I would also add, to replace it with something. So for example, replace crackers (not so good) with carrots/celery and hummus (good). If you don’t replace it with an alternative, you’ll get the munchies and probably over do it (if you’re like me). Swapping out definitely helps change food patterns!

  • Shannon Jones

    Eat whole foods! Eat what was put on this planet for us to eat, not what man has made in a factory for you to eat. It’s chemicals. Eat whole and you have nothing to worry about.

    • Melinda

      That is so the motto that I use on people that come in my office saying they need to lose weight. EAT WHAT GOD PUT ON EARTH, NOT WHAT MAN DID WITH IT AFTERWARDS!.

  • Karmacanuck

    I hit a weight plateau a few years ago. Nothing I did would get me past it. A sport nutritionist Matt Fitzgerald told me to find one thing I could do better. Cutting way back on refined boxed foods was my choice. Three and a half months later and 20 lbs lighter I think I made the right choice! Small changes, one at a time is the way to go.

  • Cela

    I agree that having a substitute for items you love is the way to make a long term change. When I want pasta, I do the zucchini noodles. When I want something crunchy like a chip, I do raw cauliflower and hummus. Instead of a slice of pizza, you can make one on a portobello mushroom. Ice cream can be replaced by just putting some frozen banana and a little almond milk in a Nutri Bullet or blender. Craving french fries? Roast some cauliflower until crispy. If you dip it in ketchup you will get the same satisfaction. And I agree about using hummus instead of salad dressing. Since it can be heavy in calories, I just put a tablespoon on the side and dip my fork in it before getting some salad. And not everyone is going to give up tortilla wraps or shells, but if you put the taco fillings into a crunchy leaf of lettuce, it is really delicious. Try some swaps as part of trying to do better. They don’t have to be all of the time, but if you do them enough, you really won’t want the non-nutritious items back. Part of it is getting your palate used to foods not laden with trans fats, salt and added sugars. It takes a few weeks, but once it kicks in, the once “boring” and tasteless foods will be all you want.

    • MichelleP

      I love that idea about the leaf of lettuce instead of the taco shell or tortilla! I don’t care for Mexican food in general, but my husband loves it and has to make fajitas or some sort of thing that goes in a tortilla on a regular basis, meaning that if I want dinner, I’ll usually have a tortilla just because it’s there. I’m going to give this a shot- thanks!

  • Karen

    Oh man. I’m so very similar to you. I’m a carboholic, but don’t by into the whole low-carb craziness. (Complex carbs are key, and not overdoing carbs as I’m so apt to do). For a while, I stopped purchasing my ‘boxed’ weaknesses (crackers and breakfast cereal… which like you, could easily become supper stand-ins) and instead snacked on… well anything else. For me it was veggies, fruit, yogurt, cheese, and nuts. I didn’t try to reduce or change anything else. And though my weight had held steady (didn’t care too much about that, though I was working out like a banshee in preparation for forest firefighting), I suddenly dropped a stubborn 5 pounds. So rah rah! Try some of those high-fat substitutes and enjoy!

  • Cassi Quiggle

    I’ve recently done something similar. I’ve cut out pasta,potatoes, white rice, all breads except for 100% whole grain bread ( 1-2 slices a day max) and subbed in TONS of fresh vegetables and fruits. Its a hard decision to make particularly because I have a very busy life and its always easier to grab things on the go. Which is how I’ve gotten into this fun predicament. So, I made the decision and it’s gotten easier each day. I’m now going on my 4th week of this change and I’m 6 pounds lighter. Which may not seem like much to some but this is with no change in my physical activity. That step is coming now. I had to retrain myself to eat proper. Good luck and keep pushing! You may find that after your month you may not want to go back!!!

  • CatSpi67

    Best of luck! I have eaten no boxed carbs or boxed, canned or processed food for a year, but “plenty” of rough carbs. Wholemeal, home-baked. Cookies are SO much better with whole meal flour!!

  • Happier

    I haven’t bought a loaf of bread since March, eaten pasta more than once a month, or had anything on a bun. I’ve lost thirty pounds.

  • Yajaira

    I would love to find out what you discover giving up “boxed carbs”. Boxed carbs are my “problem” (or “thing”, whatever) and usually accompany my at-work lunches (what else do I scoop my tuna and hummus with?!). Great article!

  • Carla

    Great article! I also try to stay away from those foods for many of the same reasons – plus they are addictive. in general I try to stay away from wheat and steer toward potatos (not from a box), rice, quinoa, and corn (yes, as in corn chips). Even in a Mexican restaurant it’s easy to substitute a corn tortilla for a flour tortilla. The wheat products induce inflammation / water retention for me but even though I feel so much better without, I still cave occasionally. Good Luck!

  • Della Monk

    This is the lesson I’ve been reinforcing with my 13 year old daughter. Once I realized the crap in all the boxed foods, I decided to try to live as close to the farm as possible. It’s been great for me, but less so for her, because she really likes to snack. We talk about what’s healthy and not. Boxed carbs are not. After all, it’s not like we can just pick them from the cracker tree! Good Luck. xo

    • Hypatia

      You might have some luck with your daughter if you and she made some of the things she likes to snack on. They’ll still be carbs, but not all the crap that comes in the box. I just read a nifty little cookbook because I couldn’t get my hubby to give up chicken-in-a-biscuit crackers which are loaded with trans-fats and all sorts of nastiness… it was called Real Snacks by Lara Ferroni.

  • Gigigo

    If/when you go back to having boxed carbs, I’d like to suggest you find a different/better pasta than Barilla. They have notoriously bad labor practices and some of the memos coming from the top lean toward an ultra-conservative religious operating policy. They even said they don’t want gays eating their pasta.

    Your no boxed carbs plan sounds like a winner. I did something similar as part of my journey that led to the loss of 268 pounds. Wishing you good health!

    • LAW

      wow! thank you for sharing! Had no idea about Barilla! Congratulations to you on your weight loss!

  • cathyL11

    Just shop the perimeter of the store where the REAL foods are. Avoid the
    Frankenfoods and carbage in the center aisles. For me Paleo has been the way to go. 20 lbs lost and keeping it off without any problem. I eat lots of animal fats and good oils like coconut, avocado, olive, and macadamia nuts. Don’t miss the bread and pasta at all.

  • Dawn

    Love this article lol Recently did the AdvoCare 24-Day Challenge (mostly for the cleanse and system reboot. Lost 6 pounds, but what I was mostly excited about was how much more energy I have, how well I was sleeping (unexpected side effect) and how much easier it became to say “no” to donut holes–my weakness! I eat my feelings so not being able to drown myself in a box of Cinnamon Toast Crunch was hard, but snacking on some celery and hummus (my new go to) has left me with a flatter tummy and actually craving more water (a gallon a day, especially here in the south during 2-hour tennis matches). Slacking off the refined boxed carbs and sugar has been a miracle for me!

    • Dawn,
      Check out eating Jicama slices along with celery for no sugar snack. The modified Atkins-style diet I’m observing doesn’t allow carrots because of their sugar content, much to my chagrin. Try the Jicama and celery – really are great and work nicely for the crunch.

      • Dawn

        Thanks! I’ll check it out!

  • Cathy

    I too would eat a box of wheat thins without thinking about it. I am going to try the hummus on the salad because I love it on celery or wasa crackers.

  • Svardkvinna

    I don’t eat many boxed carbs at all, and eat mostly whole foods except on weekends where my discipline seems to slack a little… However, the boxed carbs that I do eat are Mary’s Crackers. They are delicious and are made with brown rice, whole grains, whole seeds, non-GMO, organic, etc. and I can’t see how they compare to the usual boxed carbs. They are becoming pretty much my only “grain” food.

    • LAW

      Sound like WASA crackers and Ak Mak crackers, both of which I pretty sure my nutritionist thinks are o.k.

  • Gapsec

    When reading about Diana’s lifestyle, I thought she was talking about me. I do the same thing, although I have replaced P90X with Zumba, and I have the exact same attitude. Very interested in the outcome.

  • Courtney

    My last grocery trip was about 60% boxed carbs if I’m being honest with myself. I’m not sure why I had to buy ramen, triscuits and pita chips in the same trip (let alone different kinds of potato chips), but I think this is a really good idea.

  • LAW

    Can definitely identify with loving wheat thins, etc., we seem to have the same taste! You have a wonderful sense of humor too, very funny! I admire what a serious athlete you are. I don’t feel that is my “default” self to be very active. Sadly, I have to admit to being one who is more sedentary by nature but realizes that she needs to exercise more and tries her best to hang in there. I’ve been going to personal training at the gym 3x’s per week (expensive but good), and eating 1400 calories / day with a balance of carbs (about 50%), protein (25%) and fats (25%) of the total calories. I avoid white bread, white rice, white potatoes. I try not to eat too much salty stuff ’cause it gives me cravings for more, and very little processed food. I hope this plan that I’ve been keeping up for 5 weeks now gets me back in shape after the disaster of ignoring all this for the last four months of last year in which I put on about 20 pounds. Best of luck to all!

  • Lisa

    I’m a carb addict – boxed carbs especially. I love almost any type of cracker. I can sit and eat a whole sleeve of saltines or ritz crackers at one time. I love Wheat Thins, too. I eat high-fiber boxed carbs, too, like bran flakes and whole wheat bread because I’ve always been taught that it’s good for you. My digestive system needs the high fiber. I just need to learn substitutes. I love sandwiches. I know white bread is bad, and now everyone says wheat bread is really bad. What can I use to make a sandwich? Tips? I, too, struggle with weight loss. I know why. I just am struggling with the carb issue and need to get motivated with exercise.

  • Bernie

    My sister has been heavy all of her life until about 8 yrs ago. Now that she is super skinny she has gone to the extreme and eats like a bird (literally) I did not start struggling with weight until I got pregnant with my first kid. Now 26 yrs later, I am going to do this. It is how my sister lost 125lbs in a year. Nothing crazy or drastic, first she gave up bread, then cheese, then fast food, then sugar, then soda, each item took 30-45 days to completely stop the craving for it but the weight really started to come off and she was not exercising like an insane person. Walking and that was pretty much it. She looks so beautiful and she is now married to a loving man. She is happy and confident…She is now a food critic and into what you should or should not eat.
    Every one has to find their own solution and one set plan does not work for every body. Trust me I have tried the majority of them. Don’t give up and love yourself.

  • I agree with ideas about not doing the “boxed carbs”, I love my sweets and carbs, but I took this a few steps further in a doctor-supervised program that is very similar to a modified version of the Atkins diet. No bread, rice, beans, pasta, potatoes, and sugar (as additive or from fruit sources except blueberries & strawberries.)
    The zucchini noodles, spaghetti squash, cauliflower “mashed potatoes”, lots of veg, 8-10 oz of protein, salads with chicken or steak sliced in, sugar-free popsicles and pudding. I do lots of blueberry & strawberry, low carb/low-no sugar, non-dairy / protein powder
    What used to do me in was snacking at night while watching TV with my wife. Now, a handful or two of dry roasted/unsalted almonds, walnuts, pecans, filberts do the trick. I’ve lost almost 35# in these past 4 months, my triglycerides are now normal for the first time in years, and my A1C number is no longer in the pre-diabetic category.

    • ladyblue50

      Try any of white or red wine vinegar or cider vinegar instead of salad dressing. No calories yet perks up the lettuce etc.

  • JoAnn

    I started on Jorge Cruise Belly Fat diet and he talks about carb cycling – it’s a wonderful way to cut out boxed carbs and sugar. I feel great and the weight is coming off.

  • Brandi

    After a week-ish of not eating that stuff, it wasn’t too difficult to not eat it anymore.

  • Amy

    I always had horrible gas. It’s horribly embarrassing! So, I cut out the wheat, and I had no gas, no constipation and hardly any cravings. It was worth it! Good luck!

  • Julie R

    My diet change started with Jorge Cruise and his book THE 100. I learned a lot about the history and science behind weightloss, mostly about how sugar/carbs cause an insulin reaction that stops your cells from releasing fat, and when you limit your carbs your body is free to just shed all that excess fat/weight. It was amazing! In fact, I lost 12 pounds in the first week without ever feeling hungry because I stuck to the foods that were approved in his food lists at the back of the book. There were TONS of foods on this list that we’ve always been told are bad for us – cream cheese, whipped cream, butter, bacon, etc., etc. Mainly you focus on proteins, veggies, and moderate fats. You use your common sense and don’t overdo it, but you should never feel as though you’re starving yourself.
    The book WHEAT BELLY was another breakthrough in my new lifestyle, as it expanded on everything I had intially leared from THE 100. It opened my mind to the harmful effects of wheat, even if you don’t have celiac disease or other gluten sensitivities. Plus, there are some great wheat-free, low-carb recipes in the book, and new recipe books have come out since.
    Another resource to find great low carb recipes is Pinterest!!! I find tons of snacks, meals, and dessert recipes that are delicious, and what I like to call guilt-free!
    Some of my favorite go-to low-carb foods:
    -a piece of string cheese wrapped in a slice or two of deli meat (ever tried ham-off-the-bone from Safeway?!)
    -1/4 mixed nuts with a piece of cheese, like Babybel or Laughing Cow
    -Pork rinds are a great crunchy substitute for potato chips & come in a variety of flavors
    -Dannon Light & Fit Greek Yogurt (has the least carbs of all the yogurts i’ve seen)
    -Sugar Free Jello topped with whipped cream
    -Stuffed, bacon-wrapped jalepeno poppers
    I’ve also come to terms with being a coca cola addict. There is just something so refreshing about a nice, cold coca colad (substitute your favorite soda pop). Because I’ve accepted this about myself, I have chosen not to drink Coke. Maybe one day . . . but I know when I drink one, it’s like a flood gates been opened and I have a hard time resisting the next time. And there is a HORRIBLE number of carbs in pop. So, as a GREAT and satisfying alternative, I have discovered flavored sparkling waters. If you haven’t tried them yet, I highly recommend it! They are cold, carbonated, come in tons of flavors, and best of all they have NO CARBS and for those who care no calories. Anytime I have a craving for soda, I make sure to get myself a glass of sparkling water and my craving has been satisfied!
    I’ll get off my soap box now, but it’s hard to hold it in when I feel like i’ve been on such a successful journey. I started modifying my diet at the beginning of the year just to drop 20 pounds, but I felt so good and healthy that I made it a lifestyle change and ended up losing 40 pounds total. I hope some of this info has been helpful!

    • Julie,
      I’ll totally check out the books you mention. I agree about drinking pop and substituted the flavored seltzer waters quite a long time ago and have never looked back. Safeway sells the REFRESHE brand with lots of flavors, gives that carbonated fizz and they certainly are refreshing. I do unsweetened iced tea for caffeine later on the day sometimes, always sweeten with Stevia/Truvia.

  • Mark

    You need to read Eat to Live by Dr Joel Fuhrman. I would say more, but to read it and then live it, you will recognize the foolishness of empty carbs, white sugars, pastas and white rice…..The advertising media is doing its job and many are buying their promos. My wife died at 54 from diabetes and very poor eating habits. The last 10 years of her life was brutal, with blindness, broken feet, wheel chair, a serious stroke 4 yrs before death, and 4 yrs of dialysis. Wake up to good eating and habits that will cure and heal, and promote a stronger self image.

  • skf

    What would be a good substitute for Zesta unsalted crackers? I love my tuna fish on top of them.

  • JustPerdi

    Oh man, I fully understand this. I used to have a similar thing with ‘beige days’ which were days I ate all of the carbs and felt bloated but hungry all day. Microwave porridge, toast and then pasta. GROSS! Good luck!

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  • Michele

    Wow! This is the first time I’ve been on here and can’t stop reading! I’ve been watching carbs for a little over a month now, but am not seeing any visible results (I don’t own a scale). How long before you start to see results?

  • Anca

    Sugar, processed carbs and even simple carbs in large quantities can have such a damaging effect on he body. I lift 6 days/week, do cardio 3-4 days/week so my diet has to be on point. Sugar (as in processed sugar) has been out of my diet for almost 1 year, processed carbs for about that long, as well as starches and some of the very sugary fruit such as bananas, oranges and pineapple are not on my list anymore. I have increased the amount of fat I consume, be it from plants ( olive oil, coconut oil, almond butter) or animal sources (fatty meat, lard, butter). People ask me every day what do I eat, I tell them whole foods, a LOT of fat, no processed sugar and no processed carbs. I look and feel younger now in my 30s than when I was in my teen years 🙂

  • Liz

    What ever happened to the follow-up on this piece? I’m interested in how it turned out!