Skip These 5 Foods If You’re Working Out Soon

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Skip These 5 Foods If You’re Working Out Soon

We’ve all been there: You’re just gearing up to crush a workout, and then it strikes. “It” being the stomach cramping, the bathroom urgency, the wave of fatigue. If you’re exercising outside or in the middle of a fitness class, this gastrointestinal distress can be even more discouraging.

Although a sudden virus might be at play, it’s more likely that what you ate just before working out could be the culprit. “Exercise and digestion are mutually exclusive,” says Shawn Khodadadian, MD, of Manhattan Gastroenterology. “When you exercise, your body isn’t using its energy for digestion. It slows that process so it can divert as much blood as possible to your muscles and lungs.”

That means foods you digest just fine when not working out could cause you problems if you eat them pre-exercise. Certain foods can prompt heartburn, stomach ache or even vomiting, Khodadadian notes.

Here are some common food choices to avoid:

1. PROTEIN SHAKES & BARS

While protein is very helpful for post-workout recovery, it can be tough on your system if you have a shake right before working out. That’s because protein digests slowly, Khodadadian says. If you’re having a shake less than three hours before a workout, you could see some digestive blowback. The same goes for a high-protein bar.

The fix: If you regularly rely on a protein boost right before working out, and tend to feel not-so-great while exercising, try having the shake or bar after exercising instead.


READ MORE > IS CHOCOLATE MILK THE BEST RECOVERY DRINK?


2. MILK

Many runners love their chocolate milk fix, but they’re careful to drink the beverage after a big run or a race. That’s because milk has high amounts of protein and fat, which take time to digest.

The fix: If you’re looking for a dairy-type boost in your pre-workout mix, consider whey protein mixed with filtered water instead — but even then, consume the drink at least a few hours before your workout.

3. HIGH-FIBER CEREAL

Loading up on a carb-rich choice like cereal is tempting before exercising, especially if you’re pressed for time. But, like protein, fiber digests slowly, and your workout can interfere with that process, Khodadadian notes.

The fix: As an alternative, try a food you can digest easily that’s high in carbs but low in fiber, such as oatmeal. That way, you can get the fuel you need without the GI issues. Consider adding even more of a carb boost with bananas or mangoes.


READ MORE > SCIENCE INVESTIGATES: FASTING VS. CALORIE RESTRICTION?


4. SPICY FOOD

Even if you regularly amp up your spice levels, you may have issues if you eat too much before working out. The slower digestive processes that happen when you begin exercising could leave that delicious taco sitting in your stomach, and that can prompt indigestion or heartburn.

The fix: Skip the spice altogether and save the heat for a post-workout treat.

5. SALAD

Yes, you should load up on vegetables. But eating raw veggies can be tricky, says Terry Wahls, MD, author of “The Wahls Protocol.” Although raw vegetables have more fiber than cooked, they also have intact enzymes and their cell walls are still solid, which means it takes more energy for your body to digest them. If you’re just sitting in an afternoon meeting, that’s no big deal. But if you’re trying out your new HIIT workout, it can become a source of digestive problems.

The fix: Opt for easier-to-digest, lower-fiber cooked vegetables and save the salad for another time.

WHEN SHOULD YOU EAT?

Although some people swear by “fasted cardio” workouts, it’s usually more effective to eat something before exercising, according to Khodadadian. He says, “Not eating anything before a workout will leave you feeling tired and weak. Just give your body the proper time to digest before exercising, you may need two or three hours for digestion.”

Your blood sugar rises to help you digest, he adds. By waiting a few hours, those blood sugar levels will drop back to normal, giving you the energy you need to devote to your workout — without a stomach ache or heartburn along the way.

Related

  • G Thomson

    Right, I’m TOTALLY confused by “1. PROTEIN SHAKES & BARS”, really? My understanding is that if you work out early in the morning (I do – 7.00am) then all the protein you had has been digested and a small amount of Whey protein (around 20g) is needed. So what gives? Is it no protein at all?

    • Mel

      To my knowledge protein is to help RESTORE your muscles and it can be hard to digest at times. That’s why she was saying have protein after. It is very important to have but just not right before a workout. Hope this helps! 🙂

      • dlferriola

        I take a protein shake that is made to take before you workout and have never had a problem. The one I have been taking is by Melaleuca either Access or 20/20 shake

        • bryan wilbourn

          My guess is, the article is meant to be taken as advice for a broad spectrum of people regardless if they can handle having protein before a workout or not. Humans are all different. So this article could be targeted for a specific audience that has trouble with their digestive system during a workout. By making it one size fits all the author hurt her cause but then again, just b/c you aren’t having issues with something now doesn’t mean it’ll always be that way.

  • Brian

    I find box cereals to generally be high in carbs and LOW in fiber while oatmeal is high in both carbs AND fiber

  • Zoe Caitlin Bevers

    I agree with the comment about how, though some enjoy fasted cardio, it’s usually (for me, always) more effective to eat first. For me as a diabetic who can feel my hypoglycemia moments, failure to do so is actually self-harm.

  • Loren Wilkins Bethea

    I work out at 6:15 am. If your food needs several hours to digest, that puts me getting up at 4:am to eat and that’s not going to happen! What would you suggest I eat at 5:30 am for a very intense 6:15 am workout? I usually eat 1/2 a banana. Thanks!

    • Lina

      I workout better on an empty stomach. I just take some pre workout supplement (No Xplode) and I have a high protein meal after.

    • Orion Antares

      For me, I’ve done well just using some BCAAs, choline, and caffeine for “fasted” training sessions.

  • Bill Laughner

    Where’s the science to back these claims? I love when people post their claims without the research to back it up.

    Please don’t listen to this. Having a pre-workout Shake with a good pre-workout supplement and an apple for carbs about 40min before a workout is not going to hurt you !! Don’t need 2-3 hours to digest.

    • bryan wilbourn

      I love when people complain about there not being science to back up other folks claims and then turn around and do THE SAME THING as the person they’re complaining about. Why didn’t you supply scientific evidence for the shake and apple like you suggested the OP do?

      If you didn’t like the article or don’t agree with the advice supplied, cool. But don’t ridicule an article that’s obviously meant to help folks and not be smart enough to do what you yourself is complaining about.

    • Bob Shaw

      oh you don’t know! shut the hell up! 🙂

    • Elena Cintron

      Actually I feel pretty rotten if I have a protein shake right before a workout.

  • StealthM93

    FWIW, as I age (46 now), having a 2 to 3 hours of non-eating does lead to a better workout (both strength/tone conditioning and cardio). Of course, it really helps the that prior meal is a healthy one. 🙂

  • Carol Lynn Thistle

    I made it to the crossfit games in 2017 as a 60+ Master Woman. I started working with a nutritionist 6 weeks before I left. She did not feel I could get the best out of my workout at 5:30 am. after not having eaten for several hours since dinner. So I started getting up at 4:20 and I drink UCAN, a carb powder with water, eat half a banana and eat a piece of Eizekiel Toast. I drink a scoop or two of protein with just water after my workout and before I eat breakfast. I was 11.5% body fat and went to 8.5 in short order. I lost a few pounds of weight from 118 to 115 but I”m working on bringing that back up and I gained muscle mass. This is a case in point — your body needs something to fuel it for the workout and the protein should be taken after and then eating with proper foods like chicken, fish and shrimp throughout the day. I feel so strong, my endurance is great and my weightlifting is stronger. I hope this helps someone….

  • Bcorig

    King sized Snickers bar and 20 ounces of Diet Coke 45 minutes before.

    • TastyWheat

      Lol

  • TastyWheat

    I always eat way before working out, at least 3+ hours, i get cramps and am very sluggish if i eat first….i usually wait until after. Especially if i am running, i always run on an empty stomach, i run so much faster.

  • Maria

    I feel very tired and its very hard to run on a full stomach. I love this article because everything in it is truly real. Even when I eat a salad its very hard to get a good workout. Thank you so much for this article.

  • Noey

    Hmm… Protein shakes “tough on your system”?? I was under the impression that these shakes were already pre-digested, so your body does not have to work nearly as hard to digest them.. I enjoy a shake in the morning, about a half hour to an hour before I get to the gym, and I feel just fine throughout my workouts.. But anyhow I would love some clarity on this topic… Are these shakes in fact hard on our systems or easily digested?

  • Fawn B Morgan

    I think these claims are focused on, and perhaps limited to, those who experience digestive distress when exercising.